What is a Garden Village?

The concept is not new, it has previously been part of Britain’s development history however, there has been renewed interest in the idea of the ‘Garden City’, and how the principles that underpin the design ethos, can contribute to the supply of new homes. Garden Cities are on a larger scale with many layers and constraints to address and will therefore be delivered over a longer timeframe. Smaller scale developments of fewer than 500 dwellings have a limited scope to facilitate infrastructure projects that may be required to deliver wider improvements and benefits. By comparison, Garden Villages are an effective way to deliver housing within an appropriate timeframe and with a critical mass that will facilitate the delivery of infrastructure such as schools, medical facilities and road improvements, to the benefit of both the new and existing communities.

Each project and location has its own specific context which means the Garden City Principles are not a blueprint for designing new Garden Villages, but are key characteristics that make Garden Villages successful.

The Government continues to support Garden Villages as a sustainable means through which to deliver housing. This is reinforced in the latest National Planning Policy Framework and the Governments latest Garden Communities prospectus.

 

Garden City

  • An autonomous, self-contained settlement surrounded by countryside.

  • Independent from the neighbouring city

  • Residential, industrial, commercial and agricultural uses

  • Satellite to the neighbouring town

Garden Suburb

  • An autonomous, self-contained settlement surrounded by countryside.

  • Independent from the neighbouring city

  • Residential, industrial, commercial and agricultural uses

  • Satellite to the neighbouring town

Garden Village

  • An autonomous, self-contained settlement surrounded by countryside.

  • Independent from the neighbouring city

  • Residential, industrial, commercial and agricultural uses

  • Satellite to the neighbouring town

Each project and location has its own specific context which means the Garden City principles are not a blueprint for designing new garden villages, but there are key characteristics that make garden villages successful.

Size:
between 1,500 and 10,000 dwellings;

Free Standing Settlement:
discrete settlement, and not an extension of any existing town or village;

Local Authority Led:
should support wider housing and growth ambitions;

Local leadership and community support:
strong local commitment to delivery, engage local communities from an early stage to ensure local support;

Quality and design:
use good design to create sustainable places where people want to live and be a part of the community;

Public sector and brownfield land:
effective use of previously developed and/or public-sector land;

Local demand:
to be built as a response to meeting housing needs locally;

Viability and deliverability:
demonstrate how new infrastructure will be delivered, demonstrating a credible route to delivering quality places without additional public subsidy;

Additional or accelerated delivery:
strong prospect of quantified early and accelerated delivery of housing for a genuine addition to housing supply;

Starter Homes:
high quality starter homes to be offered at least a 20% discount for first time buyers to have a place within well-designed new communities;

Support for small and medium enterprise house builders:
opportunities to promote a range of house builders;

Innovation:
incorporating innovating forms of delivery such as off-site construction, self-build, customer build and commissioning approach; and

Infrastructure:
clearly assessed infrastructure needs.

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